Communicating New forms of Belonging in the Transnational Space of Capoeira

Last year I co-authored an article on Capoeira and Social-Media with Cristina Wulfhorst, a friend from Sydney. One of the main arguments is that the way non-Brazilian capoeiristas make use of social media (e.g. Urban Ritual in London, SCS Sommartrana in Stockholm, CapoeiraKalenteri in Finland, Volta ao Mundo and Bidna Capoeira) affects notions of belonging and identity bringing the international Capoeira community closer to Capoeira’s early emancipatory and intercultural principles. (Article available for download below) Continue reading

Capoeira classes in an Australian Immigration Detention Centre, By Stephen Jepson

Over the years I have been encouraging my students to engage in Capoeira-related activities as part of community development endeavors. I believe this is one of the best ways, I have found, to lead them to discover by themselves the intercultural libertarian and egalitarian context from which Capoeira evolved from. Whereas in Brazil these programmes usually target extremely poor youngsters, often from violent backgrounds, in Australia and Finland we have been using Capoeira classes to empower, socialize and bring playfulness to those who have been excluded because of their ethnicity and refugee statuses. In one way or another, whenever Capoeira classes are planned to empower the students, and not to serve as grass-roots recruitment for the catering group, these programmes are bringing joy, hope and strength to those living in harsh conditions world over. The following article was written by Steve, one of my students in Australia, and it tackles both the difficulties of establishing this kind of programme and the benefits it brings to refugees in detentions centres. Please leave your comments.
Axé! Eurico. Continue reading

Capoeira and security: the view from upside-down. By Zoë Marriage

Through an account of capoeira, the Brazilian dance-fight-game, we uncover two simultaneous stories of security: first, the gradual monopolisation of violence by the state; second, a somatic, lyrical representation of a history of violence, oppression and liberation. Continue reading